Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Canning Ham


OK... so I bought a big ham when they were on sale near Easter, can't pass up a good sale. We stayed home, just the two of us on Easter this year so there's that big ol' ham for two! I decided to slice out what we would eat and can up the rest... here's what I did...

First I washed my jars, this time I used quart jars, and kept them hot until I was ready for them. I simmered my lids and rings in hot water and kept them hot... and I got my trusty pressure canner out and got it ready.


I cut my ham up into chunks to fit nicely into my jars.


Once I had all the ham "chunked" up it was time to start filling the jars.


I had a nice, meaty ham bone left over and not one to waste a good ham bone, I put it in the crockpot with some pintos for supper... Yummy! But I digress... back to canning the ham...

I filled the jars with the ham chunks, leaving an inch of headspace. Now the decision... do I add broth or water to the ham? or not? I chose not, the ham would make its own juices.


I wiped the jar rims with a cloth dampened with a little vinegar (the vinegar helps remove any greasy residue better than water alone)... removed my lids (using my trusty magnetic wand gadget) and screwed them onto the jars (finger tightness) then I processed the jars, following the directions in my canner's instruction booklet, at 10 pounds of pressure for 90 minutes.

After the jars processed and the canner cooled down, the pressure returning to ZERO... I removed the jars from the canner with my jar lifter and set them on the counter on a folded dish towel to cool and seal.


I sat back, relaxing with a cool drink and listened for the sound of the PING of a successfully sealed jar! A beautiful sound!

Now if I could only can deviled eggs to go with that ham... Hmmmm... canned deviled eggs??? Nah! Guess not!

Canning Granny©2011 All Rights Reserved








21 comments:

  1. I just wanted to let you know how much I enjoy your blog. Thanks for all the hard work that you put into it. I have learned a lot and can't wait to start canning. Please keep up the good work.
    Thanks again,
    Debbie

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  2. Thank you Debbie! I enjoy it very much!
    Granny

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  3. I hope this works well with country ham. I know it only needs to hang in a cool dry place, but I want to store it long term.

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  4. Rosalyn @ rosalynpricenglish.comJuly 21, 2012 at 10:18 PM

    Can't wait to try this! Thanks so much for sharing how you do this.

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  5. How is the consistency? Some people have said it turns out mushy. Maybe they added water or broth instead of doing it like you did. Yours looks great. Makes me want to go get a ham right now. :)

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    1. Not mushy at all, it's darker than ham usually is, kind of caramelized around the edges. But very tasty. ~~Granny

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    2. You can prevent ham from turning dark by pouring broth over it, prior to pressure canning. I use 1/2 tsp canning salt per pint and 1/2 tsp of hickory liquid smoke. The broth is a bit cloudy, but the ham looks more appetizing. (just my opinion)

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  6. Hi - last Easter I picked up some ham roasts and tried to can them... they turned out burned and I just can't figure out what I did wrong. I live in Colorado at an altitude of 5280... my canner tells me that for 13 to 15 lbs of pressure. I think that is why it turned out funky. I am so disappointed because we couldn't even use the ham... it had such a bad taste to it. I think I was trying to make quarts instead of pints... because I have a large family... maybe I should cut back and know that I have to open 2 jars to feed the boys. I want to try and can ham again but am afraid to try. Any suggestions? Love you blog by the way! So many great recipes that I can't wait to try!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Rae Ann... mine are quite brown, but very good... might help keep it from getting so browned if you cover it with broth or water instead of dry canning, especially in quarts. Hope this helps. ~~Granny

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  7. Hi! I was looking for some information on canning my home cured bacon. I use pork shoulder rather than side pork, so it's alot less fat. Would you think that your process for ham would probably work the same for the bacon? I just bought a ham to cut up and freeze so I will have to try canning that, too. I already can chickens, pork, beef and venison/elk and fish. I would be using wide mouth pint jars and my hope is to process it as a larger single chunk instead of multiple chunks. Thanks!
    Jeff in Potomac, Mt.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, Jeff, I think this process would work nicely with your bacon. ~~Granny

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  8. I noticed in your instructions that you chose to 'dry' can the ham. I've read several blogs about boiling the fat/lard out and skimming it off. You didn't say if you did that before hand? Is it a personal preferrence to do so or not? Thanks in advance.

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    1. I didn't boil the fat, etc. out because I feel it adds flavor. ~~Granny

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  9. I have been canning for 47 years, and am enjoying this blog very much. My thoughts are that there isn't much that you can't put in a jar...and you are helping me prove that. Love this site and all your information.

    Thanks

    Judi K

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  10. hi granny, I enjoyed reading your instructions on canning the ham, very helpful. I was wondering if you had any ideas for canning lard? I'm thinking 10 lbs of pressure for 60 minutes. Any thoughts or instructions would be most helpful. Thanks a bunch. judy e

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    Replies
    1. I've never canned lard Judy, but your thinking sounds right to me. ~~Granny

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  11. I would like to know if I am allowed to print this. Please advise as to the format as I really would like to use your wonderful recipe this day (August 12, 2013)

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  12. My wife and I love the idea of buying a large ham and then canning it one question does it matter if it is a precooked ham or fully cooked . thank you

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    Replies
    1. Can be pre-cooked or not, doesn't matter. ~~Granny

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  13. What is the shelf life? I have bought canned meats (tuna etc) that have exp dates almost 2 years out. Will this and chicken hold that long? Blessings!

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  14. I am looking for detail about your product place leave a message when I post this
    I am looking for move information

    ReplyDelete

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