Tuesday, May 24, 2011

Canning Bread and Butter Squash Pickles


Pickles! They're not just for cucumbers any more!

Pickling foods has been around for hundreds of years... and for good reason... it's not hard to do, it preserves the foods so well, and pickled veggies are good for us in so many ways... our digestive systems LOVE pickles.

With my squash bounty I decided to make bread and butter squash pickles (so pretty in the jar... and so tasty!) Here's what I did...


I sliced up my squash in 1/4 inch slices... 16 cups


I sliced up 4 cups of onions (I used Vidalias, but any onions will work just fine)

Pay no attention to the can of pineapple behind the salt... it was used in another project!

I measured a half cup canning and pickling salt.

I mixed my squash slices and onion slices in a large stock pot, and poured the half cup of salt over the mixture.


Then filled the pot with water to completely cover the veggies.


I covered the pot and let the brine and veggie mixture sit for at least 2 hours (I think mine went for 3 while I was doing other things).


After the brine soaking time, I drained the mixture thoroughly.


For the pickling syrup, I mixed in a large stock pot...






4 Tablespoons mustard seed


2 Tablespoons celery seed


2 teaspoons ground turmeric (so good for you and adds a beautiful natural yellow color)


I brought this mixture to a boil. Then added in my squash onion mixture (drained, remember!)


I mixed it all up thoroughly and let it simmer for 5 minutes.


Then I started filling my pint canning jars that I had washed and kept hot until I was ready for them. I filled the jars with the hot pickle mixture leaving a half inch of headspace.


I wiped the jar rims with a damp cloth.


Then adjusted the hot lids and rings onto the jars to a fingertip tightness.

I love my magnetic wand gadget... so handy to have around!

I process the jars in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes.


When the processing was complete, I lifted the jars out of the water bath (with another handy gadget, my jar lifter) and set them on a folded dish towel on the counter to cool and to listen for the PING of each successfully sealed jar!

Mmmm... can't wait to have these yummy pickles with a sandwich and some chips... or with a dish of pinto beans and cornbread!




















30 comments:

  1. Lovely! Thanks for demonstrating this recipe!

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  2. Your site is such a help! About how many squash did you need to yield 16 cups sliced? Can i cut the sugar to 1 cup? Finally, how many pint jars did this yield?

    I have a brown grocery bag full of summer squash daring me to try this recipe!

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    1. I'm just guessing here, because it's been awhile since I made these and don't exactly remember... but I'd say one medium size squash will yield 1/2 to 3/4 cup, so maybe 25-30? ~~Granny

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  3. Can i cut the sugar? Thanks for this lovely post! I am making these beauties this weekend..the art isn't dead yet! Hannah

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    1. You can cut it a bit, sure. ~~Granny

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  4. I have a recipe for pickled squash that includes red pepper, onion, squash, apple cider vinegar, ground mustard, kosher salt, & sugar. Can I safely can this recipe?

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    1. Yes, Kim, sounds yummy! ~~Granny

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    2. In a boiling water bath canner?

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    3. Yes a boiling water bath canner. ~~Granny

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  5. Hi Granny:

    This recipe ROCKS! I am processing lovely yellow jars of squash pickles now. In the midst of filling jars, I thought I was running out of pickling juice. But your recipe is perfect and there was just enough juice for 6 pint jars! Thanks for sharing your expertise and teaching us younger women "what is good" (Titus 2:3) God bless you! Hannah

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  6. Hi Granny (i like writing that!):

    It's Hannah again. Have you ever canned your own fruit cocktail? My children LOVE it and the store variety is so sad and commercial looking. Any tips or suggestions? I'd love to make a mix of fresh peaches, fresh white grapes, real fresh cherries and fresh pineapple. Thanks so much for your time and expertise!

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    1. I haven't Hannah, but I think it's a great idea and since most fruits are water bath canned, there's no problem mixing them. Let me know how it turns out! ~~Granny

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  7. Hello from Germany,

    this is just what i was looking for !!!!

    greetings from
    Petra

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  8. Hi Granny! I got a big bag of fresh crook neck squash and I am about to try your recipe!! Thanks!!

    Victoria

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  9. my mother n law canned this but seems she had some cucumbers in hers also...She has passed and now I wish I had the recipe it was awsome!!!! Thanks this is the closet thing to it that I have found... :)

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  10. I have a challenge. I would like to recreate the chayote bread & butter pickles my neighbor remembers his sister making. Each year he produces a beautiful abundant crop of this squash on attractive vines. I am totally unfamiliar with chayote I:ve successfully cooked and processed fruit and berry jams for years, but I'm new to pickling. I haven't found a recipe specific. Can you help me? Will peeking or blanching be necessary?

    Amy

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    1. You can follow the above recipe and simply substitute the chayotes for the yellow squash. ~~Granny

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  11. Thank you for a wonderful recipe. Made a batch tonight, added a cayenne pepper for a little extra kick, but the instructions were spot on.

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  12. This was my first EVER canning attempt(and I won't tell you how old I am). I added the red bell pepper and zucchini. When I printed the recipe off I failed to get the hot water bath step and just sealed them and set them on cooling rack to cool. Heard the last pop from the bedroom around 1:30 AM. Is that OK or the hot bath necessary?

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    1. I saw this when I tried this recipe and I was looking at some other recipes for pickling and according to those recipes if you don't do the hot bath then they are not shelf worthy and should be put in the fridge. Wish I had come across this sooner so I could have responded faster. I would hate for you to get sick eating your pickles.

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  13. loved how easy this was i was always scared of pickling for what ever reason and thought oh this is going to be a pain but it was SO EASY! i will use this recipe from now on. i love pickled squash! i came across another recipe and it said to let pickles rest for a week so i'm going to let these rest for a week before i try them no matter if it is needed or not. i've put one jar in the fridge so it will be good and cold come monday!

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  14. Just made two batches of these pickles. Can't wait till tomorrow when I get to taste them cold. Great recipe. Thanks for sharing

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  15. Hi Granny, Thank you for this recipe. I'm a newbie to pickling ...was just wondering if I could cut this recipe in half and it still be ok? Thank you again for posting this!

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    1. Sure, you could cut it in half. ~~Granny

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  16. In New Zealand we don't use the hot water bath step if the pickles are done in vinegar. As long as the jars seal, then we consider them to be safe and store them outside of the fridge. I've been doing this for well over forty years with no problems.

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  17. Do you rinse the salt water off with water?

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  18. Do you rinse the sat off with Water?

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  19. will plain salt work or does it have to be pickling salt?

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    1. Pickling, kosher, or sea salt are best. Table salt has additives (anti-clumping agents, etc) that may cause a sediment in the bottom of your jars (won't hurt anything, just looks ugly.)~~Granny

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