Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Canning Corned Beef Brisket

I love corned beef... and cabbage... with sauerkraut... on a sandwich... love a Reuben! My DH is not a big corned beef brisket fan, so I rarely cook a whole big brisket just for me. So I thought if I bought a whole big brisket and divided it up into smaller serving sizes and canned it up, I could open a jar whenever the Irish in me insisted upon corned beef and cabbage.

Here's what I did...


I cut my brisket into chunks that would fit nicely into a wide mouth pint canning jar, leaving an inch or so headspace. I sterilized my jars in a pan of water on the stove and simmered my lids and rings, keeping them all hot until I was ready to use them.


I put the chunks of brisket into the jars. Then, taking that little packet of spices, I divided it evenly among the jars of meat.


Once my jars were filled with meat and spices, I poured boiling water to fill the jars then, using a butter knife or one of those plastic gadgets that come in canning kits, I removed any air bubbles by inserting the tool down the sides of the jar between the meat and the jar.



I wiped the jar rims with a damp cloth (dampening the cloth with a little vinegar will help remove grease better than water alone!)... then finger-tightened my lids onto the jars.


I loaded the jars into my pressure canner and, following the instructions that came with my canner, I pressured canned the pint jars of meat at 10 pounds of pressure for 70 minutes.



After the canning process completed, I removed the canner from the heat and let the pressure drop to ZERO without hurrying the process... just let it sit. Then I carefully removed the canner lid (it's still super hot, so care must be taken!) and using my jar lifter, I removed the jars from the canner, setting them on a folded dish towel on the counter to cool... and seal... I love the PING sound of a successfully sealed jar! Corned beef and cabbage... here we come!


“A cabin with plenty of food is better than a hungry castle” ~  Irish Proverb



Canning Granny©2011 All Rights Reserved











17 comments:

  1. Hi Pam,

    I just started a two week brine on a big piece of brisket with the idea to can it when its finished. I've never canned corned beef so this is a experiment for me!

    So... I just have to know -- how did this come out!!??

    Any tips you'd like to share?

    Thanks!
    rebecca

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    Replies
    1. Rebecca,

      Just wanted to say that, my ex-husband's grandmother gave us, 20 years ago, 4 Quart Jars of Canned Corned Beef. I was reluctant for a year to open and try them. However, one evening (exhausted after work and looking for a meal for my girls and myself), I got curious at looking at the jars in my pantry and pulled one out. OMG!!! IT WAS TO DIE FOR!!! I kicked myself for letting this sit for a year. Needless to say, all 4 quarts were eaten FAST!

      Terri
      Kansas City

      P.S. His grandmother past away about 2 years after giving those to us! They lived on a farm in Northeast Kansas and raised Angus.

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    2. I did this with some venison. You won't believe how good it is. And it's easy to do.

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  2. Turned out GREAT! Very tender and yummy! Good luck with yours!
    Granny

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  3. Where did you get the spice packets - and what are the spices?

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  4. The spices came with the corned beef brisket, inside the package with the meat. It contains Mustard Seeds, Coriander, Black Peppercorns, Cracked Bay Leaf, Crushed Chilies, and Dehydrated Garlic, according to the ingredients list.

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  5. Ah. I'll have to see if I can find a brisket with the spices :) Thanks.

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  6. you can also slow cook as much brisket as you can fit in your slow cooker, cook overnight, and load into sterile jars in the morning. A lot less hassle, and still get that satisfying ping! of a sealed jar...

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  7. I have never pressure canned yet, but that's next year's expense and project, can't wait ....

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  8. It's definitely worth the investment. ~~Granny

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  9. Granny....PLEASE put my mind at rest! I have canned a lot of corned beef, using your recipe and directions. I was just told that when canning raw meat, I should NEVER add a liquid!! A tsunami of fear has just washed over me!! Even the canning books say, "Do Not Add Liquid" I will be wringing my hands and frantically pacing the floors awaiting your response!!!

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    Replies
    1. Deb, when raw packing meat for canning, it will produce a lot of its own liquid, adding liquid can be unnecessary. It doesn't hurt anything, it isn't unsafe, it just may be unnecessary. I like the extra liquid in corned beef just because I like it, but you don't HAVE to add it. I'm sure yours is great (I know mine is!) ~~Granny

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    2. I agree with Pamela. The canned Corn Beef we received from my ex-husband's grandmother had about 30 percent liquid in the jars. It was just fine and DELICIOUS!

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  10. I was considering adding sauerkraut along with the spices in stead of water. Any down side to doing this?

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  11. Did you trim the fat from the brisket before putting it in the jars? It doesn't look like you did. I LOVE home-cooked corned beef, and would like it more frequently. I think I'll try this. Diane

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  12. I'm going to try the hot pack because I do want less salt and the meat looked lovely served. I can't wait to try this this coming weekend. Brisket goes on sale tomorrow. :)

    ReplyDelete

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