Monday, August 6, 2012

Canning Bruschetta in a Jar


Always on the lookout for another tomato canning recipe, I found this recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" in the Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving and had to give it a try. Bruschetta is an antipasto from Italy whose origin dates to at least the 15th century. It consists of roasted bread rubbed with garlic and topped with extra-virgin olive oil, salt and pepper. Variations may include toppings of spicy red peppertomato, vegetables, beans, cured meat, or cheese; the most popular recipe outside of Italy involves basil, fresh tomatogarlic and onion or mozzarella. Bruschetta is usually served as a snack or appetizer. In some countries, a topping of chopped tomato, olive oil and herbs is sold as Bruschetta.

This mixture of fresh tomatoes, spices, vinegars, and white wine can be spooned onto a toasted baguette and garnished with grated cheese and a splash of olive oil for a zesty snack or side dish with an Italian meal.

Here's what I did...

I washed and sterilized my half pint jars and put my lids in hot water to simmer... keeping everything hot until I was ready for them.

In my large, stainless steel sauce pan, I combined...

5 cloves garlic, finely chopped


1 cup dry white wine


1 cup white wine vinegar


1/2 cup water
2 Tbsp. granulated sugar


2 Tbsp. dried basil
2 Tbsp. dried oregano


2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar


Bring this mixture JUST to a boil, then remove from heat.

Previously I had prepared...
9 cups chopped, peeled, cored tomatoes
... and set them aside.


Tip: Plum tomatoes work better than globe tomatoes, but since all I had were globe tomatoes, I chopped them up and drained them through a colander for 30 minutes before using.

I packed the tomatoes (raw and cold) into my hot half pint jars to within a generous half inch of the top of the jar.


Then I ladled the hot vinegar mixture into the jars to cover the tomatoes, leaving a half inch headspace. I removed any air bubbles and adjusted headspace if necessary by adding more vinegar mixture.


I wiped the jar rims with a damp cloth and tightened my hot lids on to fingertip tightness.


I processed the jars in a boiling water bath... placing the jars in my canner ensuring they were completely covered with water, and bringing the water to a boil and processing for 20 minutes.

After processing, I removed the jars using my jar lifter and set them on a folded dish towel on the counter to cool and to listen for the PING of each successfully sealed jar.

Can't wait to have this zesty spread on a toasted baguette or maybe even as a "gourmet" pizza sauce with some mozzarella and a drizzle of olive oil... Yumminess in a jar!


For a printable copy of this recipe, click here

51 comments:

  1. I don't drink wine and wouldn't know how to tell which white wine is dry. Please tell me the name of the white wine you used. Thank you.

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  2. Shannon you can prob use white cooking wine.

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    Replies
    1. DON'T use cooking wine. Yuk. Full of nasty stuff and will taste terrible. Use a $5-7 bottle of Chardonnay or Sauvignon Blanc, ideally. It will be wonderful.

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  3. Chardonnay was the wine they used in a Italian restaurant I use to worked in.

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  4. I made this recipe - but had a lot of the liquid mixture left. The jars were full. Did you use all the liquid?

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    Replies
    1. I had quite a bit of liquid left over as well, Brenda. ~~Granny

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  5. I am so new to this, but as a new mom I wanted to start eating food with trustworthy ingredients. How do you know if foods should be pressure cooked or canned? Is there a specific way for certain foods or can you use either proces? Please help (:
    -Sara

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    Replies
    1. Sara, High-acid foods may be canned using the boiling water bath method of canning... these include, tomatoes, most fruits, jams and jellies, pickles and relishes, salsas,chutneys. Low-acid foods must be pressure canned... these include most vegetables, meats, soups and stews, seafood. I recommend having a good canning book so you can keep referring to it as you learn and as you continue to can. The Ball Blue Book is a good one and is quite inexpensive and found at WalMart and most grocery stores. My favorite canning book is The Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving and can be found on Amazon.com or most book stores. These books have tons of recipes as well as instructions on canning pretty much everything, lists of foods and the times, pounds pressure, etc. needed to preserve each food. I use my canning book every time I can. ~~Granny

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  6. what would be the down side of using fresh basil instead of dried?

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    1. Downside? Hmmm... can't think of a downside... unless you use so much that it is no longer acidic and you couldn't water bath can it... you'd have to add an awful lot, however, for that to happen... Go for it! There is no downside! ~~Granny

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  7. Replies
    1. Rihtaš mal? Rithaš?

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  8. We don't drink or cook with wine for religious reasons. Is there something else I can sub? BTW: LOVE your blog! I'm pinning from it like crazy!

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    1. Hmmm, Micki, try it with apple juice or white grape juice. Let me know how it turns out! ~~Granny

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    2. SAME HERE ON RELIGIOUS REASONS, HOWEVER, I DO USE SPIRITS IN RECIPES THAT THE SPIRITS ARE COOKED OUT. YOU GET GREAT FLAVOR.

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  9. definitely! this is on the agenda for this weekend :)

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  10. This sounds great! but it says to add the hot vinegar mixture into the jars to cover the tomatoes but doesn't say how long to cook the vinegar mixture. thanks

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    Replies
    1. Bring it JUST to a boil, then remove from heat, sorry 'bout that! ~~Granny

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    2. Thank you can't wait to make this!! Have a nice holiday weekend!

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  11. How long do you recommend letting it sit for, before opening? Also, will using jarred, minced garlic be okay? Fresh garlic is hard to come by, around here :) Thanks!!

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  12. I'm getting ready to make this and was wondering how many jars to prep?

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  13. what happens if you don't peel the tomatoes?I have lots of cherry tomatoes and was hoping to use them for this recipe, will they work?

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    Replies
    1. If you don't mind the peelings, you can certainly leave them on... I don't happen to care for peelings. ~~Granny

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    2. I used cherry tomatoes and chopped them. I also had lots of the liquid mixture left so I just filled more jars with tomatoes. :)

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  14. thanks for all your recipes - I can't wait to try this one!

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  15. how many 1/2 pint jars does this make?

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    Replies
    1. If memory serves, I got 8 half pints Suzanne. ~~Granny

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  16. Granny, I love that you reply to everyone :) Love reading comments so I can hear the feedback before I take on a task. I am going to use your recipe tomorrow. I have already canned tomatoes, salsa, spaghetti sauce and dried my cherry tomatoes! After the bruschetta this will be the last of my tomatoes...Whew!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Cindy! I know what you mean about the tomatoes... I had millions this year! ;-) ~~Granny

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  22. Is it normal for the vinegar mixture to have all the seasonings settle to the bottom of the pot and how do I get them all mixed into the tomatoes?

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    Replies
    1. It is normal... just stir and stir... that's the only way I know to get it all mixed. ~~Granny

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  23. Is it possible to mix up a batch of bruschetta, place in sterilized jars and then proceed with the water bath instead of heating the dressing and adding to tomatoes in the jar? I'm guessing there's a reason this isn't possible, but would love to know why.

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    Replies
    1. I'm sure you could do it that way... I'm thinking the reason is the herbs, etc. in the dressing will be more evenly distributed if you add them separately. ~~Granny

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  24. This is no more than stewed tomatoes ...where's the all important olive oil to make it luscious? That's the way the jarred one I get from Italy comes and it's outstanding!!

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    Replies
    1. I agree Susan. I don't use wine at all, I just use the Olive Oil and the vinegar and FRESH BASIL and tons of it....

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  25. I hope this isn't posting twice.. my apologies if it does. I added the tomatoes to the vinegar mix and then drained them out when I realized what I had done. The main forseeable problem is that most of the garlic is now trapped in the tomatoes. Do you think it's unsavable? Should I up the waterbathing time? Eeeekkk... The jars are iin the oven and the vinegar mix is heating. thanks in advance

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    Replies
    1. As long as everything eventually gets mixed together, it really doesn't matter so much what order they're in... they'll be fine! ~~Granny

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  26. On a side note, I did not add any water and ended up with over 2 pints of extra liquid (probably because I began with 24 cups of tomatoes (21 plants this year!!!).

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  27. Do not change the recipes! They have been tested, with the proportions for acidity. Oil is not water, fresh herbs are not dried herbs. FOLLOW the recipe.

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  28. I usually make brushetta with balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Can these ingredients be used instead of the wine and white wine vinegar?

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  29. Drizzle the olive oil when you are making the bruchetta

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  30. You put on the Ball site that you thought their recipe was nasty. Did you change the recipe, or your mind? I am looking for a recipe and passed on their's due to your comment.

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    1. As far as I know, I have NEVER posted any comments on the Ball site, much less saying this recipe was nasty. Someone must be impersonating me! ~~Granny

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