Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Pot Roast in a Jar... Canning Roast Beef

I found a nice pot roast on sale at the grocery store recently... it was a big one, bigger than DH and I could eat for one meal. I usually would cook it anyway and we would eat leftovers for a few days. This time I decided to can it.

Now, I have several jars with portions just the right size for two and now when we want pot roast we can pop open a jar and heat and eat.

Here's what I did...

I sterilized my canning jars by boiling them upside down in a pan set on two stove eyes. I placed a dish towel in the bottom to keep the jars from tipping over, added two or three inches of water, and boiled them for 15 or 20 minutes.


And I sterilized my lids and rings by bringing just to a boil and simmering them for 10 or 15 minutes, keeping them hot until time to put them on the jars (don't boil the lids, just simmer).


Then I cut my hunk of beef into "jar-sized" pieces... pieces that would fit easily into the wide mouth pint jars.


I ended up with four nice sized pieces. Next I chopped an onion and divided it into the four jars.


Then I put in the pieces of meat, making sure to leave a half inch of headspace.


I added a teaspoon of salt in each jar.


Then filled each jar with boiling water.



I removed any air bubbles by inserting a butter knife or one of those handy-dandy air bubble removing tool sold in canning kits.



I wiped the rims of the jars with a damp cloth (Tip: dampening the cloth with a little vinegar will help remove grease) and tightened the lids onto the jars.


I processed the jars in my pressure canner following the instructions provided with the canner.



For pints, process at 10 pounds of pressure for 70 minutes.
For quarts, process at 10 pounds of pressure for 90 minutes.



Turn the heat off from underneath the canner when the time is up and let it cool, allowing the pressure to go down. (DON'T try to hurry the cooling process, let it cool on its own! Don't want any exploding jars!)

When the pressure went down to ZERO, I removed the lid from my canner and lifted the jars out using a jar lifter (which I love!), setting them to cool on a folded dish towel on the counter... setting them at least an inch apart so air can circulate around them.



When I heard the "PING" of the jar lids sealing, I knew I had successfully canned pot roast! It's a beautiful sound!

Leave the jars undisturbed for 12-24 hours, then check that they are still sealed, label with the date, and store in a cool, dark place.

Pot Roast in a Jar... Yum!

Canning Granny©2011 All Rights Reserved

48 comments:

  1. Do you have a standard electric / gas stove, or a flat surface cooktop type? Your reference to 'eyes' makes me think it is a flat surface?

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  2. Actually when I canned up the pot roast back in the early spring, I had a standard electric stove with regular eyes... We moved in late June and the new house has a flat surface stove... ~~Granny

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  3. I saw my aunt and mom can fish one time. We used it for "salmon patties". Many years ago.

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  4. I am looking for safe recipes for meats, stews etc. that I can send my son-in-law in Afghanistan. Would this pot roast be safe? Anything that you could suggest would be wonderful. These men would appreciate a little piece of home.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, definitely, this would be safe for shipping... just pack the jars good so they don't break! LOL! ~~Granny

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    2. wrap them in socks or bubble wrap. then Ziploc bag them individually, then as a whole double zip lock bag them. works great when sending to my husband during deployments. but be careful those jars break all the time over there. tell your son in law and daughter thank you so very much.

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    3. I just canned ground beef with onion and garlic and spices to send to my husband in Afghanistan to make chili. I had already canned a roasted tomato chili sauce and am adding regular cans of beans and tomatoes to the box(es).

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  5. How long can it store on the shelf?

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    Replies
    1. At least a year... maybe more. ~~Granny

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    2. Why would you want to do this in the first place? I just go to my butcher and buy whatever I want and get it fresh. Maybe if you live where you get snow bound, it would come in handy. I don't know....sounds weird.

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    3. I do this also. I get meat on sale to save money. I also dont have freezer space. And because this is all made and ready to go for a meal, it saves me time and energy. I have a medical problem that causes me fatigue in the evenings, and cooking a good dinner is sometimes a challenge.

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  6. What do you use this for? Tacos, soup, enchiladas? I love this blog and all of your good info!

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  7. I have been canning meat for about 14 years and I love it! I mostly just do chicken now, but have done salmon, hamburger and beef. You actually don't need to add any water to the meat as it creates it's own juices as it cooks.
    I use my chicken for soup, salad, casseroles and just eat it straight out of the jar too. It really is delicious and so convenient. Instead of regular salt I use garlic salt and like the flavor it gives.
    Hamburger looks disgusting and I don't love the flavor. It's great for adding to chilli, soups, etc., but I wouldn't use it for tacos and such. Just didn't like the taste enough.

    I know you could store the meat for a few years at least, but mine goes pretty quickly! I do 36 pints 2 - 3 times a year. Sometimes I use boneless skinless, but I also use bone in and then make a massive batch of chicken stock, which I also can.

    I have a gas stove, and have been told that you can't use a pressure cooker on a flat top as it will ruin your stove. Check your manual on your stove.

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  8. P.S.
    I think you're only supposed to use 1/2 tsp salt for pints. tsp for quarts. Might be different with beef, but that's what it is with chicken!

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  9. i'm assuming that the roast if fully cooked at the end of the pressure cooking cycle? this is a great idea! that's for sharing.

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  10. Can you can the roast beef in a water bath if you don't have a pressure canner? Just wondering...

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    Replies
    1. I would like to know the answer to that too! I have never been comfortable using a pressure cooker.

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    2. No, you can't. You will not kill the bacteria in the jar. You need to pressure cook foods with low acidity.

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    3. So what did they do before pressure canners were invented?

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    4. they salted and cured or smoked the meat. theres lots of information on the internet. please dont risk it and kill someone. the main baddie to worry about is botulism, it thrives in low acid, anaerobic (no oxygen) environments. vegetables and meats are low acid. botulism can paralyze and kill you, dont mess around with the rules.

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    5. No you definitely can not water bath can meat. Must be done under pressure. Yes to everything OopzyDayzy said.

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    6. I would like to reply to the question asked about water bath canning meat. Myself, my mother, and my grandmother have water bath canned beef in 1 inch cubes in a water bath canner for years. We cut up the beef into 1 inch hunks, leave a lot of the fat on it. pack it tightly into a quart jar, leave one inch for headspace. Add a tsp of salt. wipe the rim and put it in the hot but NOT boiling water bath canner. Put the lid on and watch it. Once it starts to boil, start timing. We do ours for 2 hours. Now, I am not saying it is 100% fail proof...however we have done this for many years. Just remember, when you open it.....when in doubt, throw it out!

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  11. My pressure cooker does not have lbs pressure regulator only a metal thing that jiggles on top with a metal top that moves up when the pressure is built up. when the pressure is gone, the top on it drops down. Will this type of pressure work with the same number of minutes to cook. Wondering how much water should be in the cooker, to cover the top of the cans or half way?

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    Replies
    1. yes it will work, provided you have the right weight (the thing that jiggles) the weight you use determines the pressure inside the canner. the pressure you need depends on your altitude, you need more weight at a higher altitude.
      i recommend you get the Complete Guide to Home Preserving, its from Ball.
      the level of water within your canner depends on the model, check the instructions that came with it, or look up the model online.

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    2. You also need to check with your County Extension Agent for the right weights. Ball doesn't cover that kind of canner. But the Extension Agent can help you with it. Don't try to guess. That could be deadly.

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  12. the answer to what was used before pressure cookers the same thing you can buy in a goog store an agate canner with a jar rack instead of pressure you will boil longer.be sure to buy a jar lifter and a good blue book on canning or other fine canning book

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  20. What recipes do you use this in? Any favorite recipes for this canned roast beef?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like to thicken the broth with a little cornstarch and serve it over rice... there are tons of possibilities. ~~Granny

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  21. can you use a water bath canner instead of a prssure canner?

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  22. I have a flat top electric stove and am just not convinced the temperature could remain constant enough to use a pressure canner. The temperature doesn't even stay constant enough for regular cooking. I got an induction plate from Amazon and it is the answer! It uses very little electric and is very affordable. I got a Fagor pressure canner and it works beautifully. You set the time and the temperature and walk away! You can also use it for regular cooking but you have to make sure your pots and pans are compatible. Calphalon-type pans will not work as an induction plate works magnetically. Look it up on Amazon and see all the great information. Eazi-Store has pots and pans that are not only great to cook in but work perfectly with the induction plate.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi, I write from Spain, How many days I can save this food? in Spain the jars are different, How can i know if the jars are not good conditions to eat?
    Congratulations for your blog.
    thank you so much

    ReplyDelete
  24. Can you use a roast that has already been cooked? If yes, please advise me with instructions. Thanks so much.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Can you use a roast that has already been cooked? If yes, please advise me with instructions. Thanks so much.

    ReplyDelete
  26. This reply is for LINDAR. Why would you want to can a roast? What if you had a disaster and couldn't get to a store or the store was sold out; what if you were snowed in and no power? It always pays to have at the very least, a weeks worth of food to eat and a way to cook it. Ideally, a years food storage would be best. Just buy two of everything and put one away for the future. Be sure and store plenty of water. You can survive without food, but not very long without water. What if you didn't have a job and couldn't afford to buy food; food storage to the rescue! It pays to plan ahead for anything that may happen in the future.

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  27. Hello,
    I learned all this from my mother and grandmother years ago. I never used it. However, now I have gone back to the basics, because I live 10 miles in any direction to go to the store and want to save on gas. It is also hard to cook for one person and I have no more waste. I also have control overt what goes into my food, no preservatives.

    I can pork, beef, hamburger, pasta sauce, marinara sauce, chili, soups and other combinations. I have started dehydrating just about everything meats, veg, fruits, jars of soup combinations. I also do cakes in jars. Mix my own spice combinations. I also do oven canning for crackers, beans, rice, oatmeal and any other dry food. Lasts almost forever.

    You do not have to do many jars at a time. It is easy

    I make my own laundry soap.

    I save a lot of money and buy when there is a sale.

    This is a nice site and very helpful.

    qylter, December 1, 2013


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace I am very interested in what you said about oven canning rice, beans etc. but have never heard of it. Could you please tell me how to do that or a site to go to for that info. Thank you Maggie

      Delete
  28. The oven canning caught my eye too. I'll have to check back for a possible response. Thanks for all the great information.

    ReplyDelete
  29. The oven canning caught my eye too. I'll have to check back for a possible response. Thanks for all the great information.

    ReplyDelete
  30. To Margaret and Granny. I cook all my own gluten-free foods and buy in bulk. This is how I do my dry canning.
    http://www.glutenfreepoodlehome.com/?p=811

    ReplyDelete

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