Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Soup of the Day... Cajun Chicken Soup



Soup... a Poem by Carl Sandburg

I saw a famous man eating soup.
I say he was lifting a fat broth
Into his mouth with a spoon.
His name was in the newspapers that day
Spelled out in tall black headlines
And thousands of people were talking about him.

When I saw him,
He sat bending his head over a plate
Putting soup in his mouth with a spoon.


Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.


Cajun Chicken Soup Recipe

Found on tasteofhome

Makes 3 quarts 


6 cups chicken broth - store bought or home canned 

3 cups of cooked shredded chicken 

1 medium onion, chopped 

2 celery ribs, chopped 

1-2 garlic cloves, minced 

1 can (10 ounces) diced tomatoes and green chilies, drained 

3/4 cup orange juice 

2 teaspoons Cajun seasoning - premade or make your own (Recipe for homemade is at the bottom) 

1 teaspoon dried oregano 

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin 

1/2 teaspoon paprika 

Instructions 

Add to a large pot chicken stock, shredded chicken, chopped onion, celery, garlic, can of drained diced tomatoes and green chilies, orange juice, Cajun Seasoning, oregano, thyme, cumin, and paprika. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 20 mins. Fill quart jars to 1 inch headspace, process in a pressure canner at 10 lbs for 90 mins. 

To Serve - Empty one quart of soup into a pot, add 1/2 tablespoon minced fresh cilantro, 3/4 cup to 1 cup cooked rice, and 1 can of drained and rinsed pinto beans. Heat soup for about 15 mins and serve. 

Cajun Seasoning Mix Recipe 

2-1/2 tablespoons salt 

1 tablespoon dried oregano 

1 tablespoon paprika 

1 tablespoon cayenne pepper 

1 tablespoon ground black pepper 

Put all in a Ziploc bag and shake to mix.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... (Copy Cat Recipe) Campbell's Chunky Beef Soup with Country Vegetables

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Soup of the Day... Cabbage Soup



Health benefits of cabbage


  • Fresh, dark green-leafy cabbage is incredibly nutritious; but very low in fat and calories. 100 g of leaves provide just 25 calories.
  • The vegetable is a storehouse of phyto-chemicals like thiocyanates, indole-3-carbinol, lutein, zea-xanthin, sulforaphane, and isothiocyanates. These compounds are powerful antioxidants and known to help protect against breast, colon, and prostate cancers and help reduce LDL or "bad cholesterol" levels in the blood.
  • Fresh cabbage is an excellent source of natural antioxidant, vitamin C. Provides 36.6 mg or about 61% of RDA per 100 g. Regular consumption of foods rich in vitamin C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free radicals.
  • Total antioxidant strength measured in terms of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC value) is 508 µmol TE/100 g. Red cabbages contain more antioxidant value, 2252 µmol TE/100 g.
  • It is also rich in essential vitamins such as pantothenic acid (vitamin B-5), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6) and thiamin (vitamin B-1). These vitamins are essential in the sense that our body requires them from external sources to replenish.
  • It also contains a adequate amount of minerals like potassium, manganese, iron, and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Iron is required for the red blood cell formation.
  • Cabbage is a very good source of vitamin K, provides about 63% of RDA levels. Vitamin-K has the potential role in bone metabolism through promoting osteotrophic activity. So enough of vitamin K in the diet would gives you healthy bones. In addition, vitamin-K also has established role in the cure of Alzheimer's disease patients by limiting neuronal damage inside their brain.
Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Cabbage Soup 
by Vickie Wright

INGREDIENTS

½ head of cabbage, chopped

1 cup celery, diced

1 cup white or yellow onion, diced

1 cup carrots, diced

1 green bell pepper, diced

2-­3 cloves garlic, minced

4 cups chicken broth

14 oz can diced tomatoes

1 teaspoon oregano

1 teaspoon basil

½ teaspoon red pepper flakes and cayenne pepper

Salt and Pepper to taste

(I also put water, chopped potatoes and summer sausage in mine)

INSTRUCTIONS

Heat 2­-3 tablespoons of olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add celery, onions, bell peppers, and carrots. Saute until slightly tender. Stir in garlic. Pour in chicken broth. Stir in tomatoes and cabbage. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat. Cook until cabbage is tender. Stir in oregano, basil, red pepper flakes, black pepper and salt (if using)Taste broth and adjust seasoning if needed. Fill jars to 1 inch line and pressure can 75 minutes for pints 90 for quarts.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Cajun Chicken Soup

Monday, September 28, 2015

Soup of the Day... Cabbage Soup Diet




Campbell's Soup Trivia

• In 1900 Campbell's sold about 500,000 cans of soup per year. By the early 1920s sales were about 18 million cans per week!
• Campbell Soup Company started out as a canning company in New Jersey in 1869. It was founded by an icebox maker (Abram Anderson) and a fruit merchant (Joseph Campbell). Later, Arthur Dorrance replaced Anderson, and it was a nephew of Dorrance, chemist John, who invented condensed soup in 1897. This gave the company a decided advantage over competitors because shipping costs were much reduced, which enabled it to become one of the first food companies to have national distribution. The soups won a gold medal at the Paris Exposition in 1900, and the medal has been on the label since then.
• The label on one of Campbell's original products, canned tomatoes, showed a giant tomato being hauled by two men.
• Campbell Soup Company sells more than 100 million cans of pork and beans a year.
• The colors of Campbell's Soup labels, red and white, come from the colors of the Cornell University football team.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Cabbage Soup Diet 
submitted by Wendy Parnell Creasey

Ingredients:
5 carrots, chopped 

3 onions, chopped 

2 16-oz. cans diced tomatoes with liquid 

1 large head of cabbage, chopped 

1 1-oz. envelope of onion soup mix (I used beefy onion) 

1 15-oz. can cut green beans, drained (I used home canned and liquid) 

2 quarts tomato juice 

2 green bell peppers, diced (I used different colors) 

10 ribs of celery, chopped 

1 14-oz. can beef broth 

Salt & pepper to taste 

Hot sauce to taste (optional)

Super easy directions: Prepare the above ingredients as instructed. Add everything to a large stock pot. If you need to, add water or more beef stock/tomato juice to cover the vegetables. Bring to a slow boil, then turn down to low and let simmer until the vegetables are tender.

Personally, I like big, chunky vegetables with some substance to them (NOT mushy!). If you cut the vegetables in large, hearty chunks, they will hold up very well under pressure canning (if you're the type of person to do that kind of thing *wink emoticon*).

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Cabbage Soup

Sunday, September 27, 2015

Soup of the Day... Cabbage Borscht



Borsch, also spelled borscht, borsht, or bortsch,
beet soup of the Slavic countries. Although borsch is important in Russian and Polish cuisines, Ukraine is frequently cited as its place of origin. Its name is thought to be derived from the Slavic word for the cow parsnip, or common hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), or from a fermented beverage derived from that plant. The more-palatable cultivated beet eventually replaced the wild cow parsnip as the basis of the soup.

Borsches are eaten hot or cold. Some are clear and light, others thick and substantial. Many recipes counterbalance the sweetness of the beets with the addition of kvass (also spelled kvas). The term kvass may refer to a sour, slightly alcoholic beer made from bread or to a concoction of fermented beets; both are used. Vinegar, lemon juice, or citric acid can be added to achieve a similar effect.

Ukrainian borsch is a hearty soup of beef and a variety of vegetables in which root vegetables and cabbage predominate, and the soup takes its characteristic deep red colour from beets. The soup is often eaten with a sour cream garnish and with pirozhki, turnovers filled with beef and onions. A meatless beet soup is made with a stock flavoured with forest mushrooms; this Polish version is served with tiny mushroom-filled dumplings, uszka. ~britannica.com


Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Cabbage Borscht 
Found on Pinterest

Ingredients
5 lbs tomatoes (I used 2 quarts stewed) 

8 cups coarsely shredded cabbage (I used red) 

7 cups water 1 cup diced beets or pickled beets, drained 

2 cups chopped onions 

1 cup chopped apples 

2 Tablespoons instant beef bouillon 

2 Tablespoons sugar or brown sugar 

2 Tablespoons lemon juice 

1 teaspoon salt (optional) 

1/8 teaspoon pepper 

1 tsp. dill weed (optional) 

3 Tbsp. Tomato paste (optional) 

Directions

Wash, scald, peel, remove stem ends and cores, and quarter tomatoes. Use a small spoon to scrape out the excess seeds, if desired. In 4 to 6 quart kettle or Dutch oven combine all ingredients. Bring to a boil, boil uncovered 5 minutes. Ladle hot soup into hot jars, filling half the jar with solids and the rest with liquid. Leave 1″ head space. Adjust the lids. Process in pressure canner at 10 pounds, 60 minutes for pints or 75 minutes for quarts. Adjust for your altitude.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Cabbage Soup Diet

Saturday, September 26, 2015

Soup of the Day... Broccoli-Cauliflower Leek Soup




A Jewish woman had two chickens. 
One got sick, so the woman made chicken soup out of the other one to help the sick one get well.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Broccoli-Cauliflower Leek Soup 
Recipe found on Pinterest and alilcountrysugar

NOTE: Even though in this recipe they do not puree this soup you might want to when you go to heat it up. These veggies are gonna be really mushy. But you can freeze it to maintain the shape and keep the veggies from being overly done.

INGREDIENTS | MAKES 6–8 QUARTS 

3 large leeks, cleaned and sliced 

½ pound of mushrooms, cleaned and sliced 

1 tablespoon olive oil 

6 medium-size potatoes, peeled and cubed 

1 head broccoli, cleaned and chopped

1 head cauliflower, cleaned and chopped 

1 cup diced onion 

6 carrots, peeled and diced 

2 cloves garlic, minced 

1 tablespoon basil 

Salt to taste pepper to taste 

16 cups chicken broth 

Sauté the leeks and mushrooms in olive oil. Put all the remaining ingredients in a stockpot; cover with broth. Bring to a full boil. Meanwhile, purée half of the leeks. Add puréed leeks, sliced leeks, and mushrooms to boiling soup. Simmer another 15 minutes, stirring constantly. Cool and freeze.

If canning, move into sterilized jars. Wipe rims. Process in a pressure canner at 10 pounds pressure for 1 hour and 15 minutes for pints or 1 hour and 30 minutes for quarts.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Cabbage Borscht

Friday, September 25, 2015

Soup of the Day... Booyah, Savannah Style



Booyah is a thick soup of presumably Belgian origin made throughout the Upper Midwestern United States.

Booyah has many claims of origin... here is ONE story... 

Booyah & the Finger Road School Teacher

In 1906, a man named Andrew Rentmeester took over as the teacher at the Finger Road School in Green Bay. When he got to the school, there were no books for the kids – so he decided to organize a fundraiser to raise some money for much needed school supplies.

He went around town collecting chickens from the school children’s families. Then he went to the Green Bay Gazette to put an ad in the paper in hopes of raising some publicity for the fundraiser. When the reporter asked him what they’d be serving at the event, Andrew told him “bouillon,” which is the french word meaning “to boil” or “soup”.

When the reporter asked him how to spell it, Andrew said “B-O-O-Y-A-H.” It probably seems a little strange that a teacher wouldn’t know how to spell bouillon correctly. He had a valid reason though—

But, it was printed that way in the paper and the soup was called “booyah” at every fundraiser after that, including the annual fundraiser Andrew started at Holy Martyrs of Gorcum church the following year.

Andrew, the schoolteacher was a lumberjack before he became a teacher at age 21. He also didn’t speak or read French. He was a very smart man though. He taught all nine of his own kids. Andrew’s mother, Mary (Watermolen) Rentmeester, actually came from Belgium and she spoke French. It was his mother’s soup recipe that was used for the Finger Road school fundraiser.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Booyah, Savannah Style

Adapted from recipe found on nonesuchexists.blogspot

The best way to describe Booyah is that it is a glorified chicken soup. It is generally made with two kinds of meat but chicken is the predominate meat. You can either use beef or pork as the second meat, totally up to you.

Makes 10+ quarts

Ingredients

1 whole rotisserie chicken, de-boned, skin discarded, meat shredded 

OR 

you can use any chicken you like - at least 3 to 4 cups of chicken 

2 pounds beef stew meat or pork (pork can be ground) (usually beef is precooked and shredded but can be cubed and added raw) (If using ground meat - precook and drain well) 

2 large onions, chopped 

3 celery ribs, chopped 

4 cups shredded green cabbage 

4 cups homemade vegetable or beef stock or broth 6 cups chicken broth 

1/2 of rutabaga, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces 

3 cloves of garlic, grated/minced 

2 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes or 2 pints of home canned diced tomatoes OR you can use 1 quart of home canned tomato juice. 

1 pound (2 or 3) russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces 

2 carrots, peeled and sliced 1/4 inch thick 1

/2 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg 

1 cup frozen peas 

1 cup frozen corn 

2 teaspoon of Sriracha sauce

INSTRUCTIONS

In a large stock pot add onions, carrots, grated garlic, and celery. Stir in stock/broth and canned diced tomatoes. Turn on heat to medium high. Add shredded beef, cabbage, nutmeg, 1-1/4 teaspoons canning salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and stir in potatoes, shredded chicken, rutabaga, corn, Sriracha sauce, and peas. Stir well to ensure even mixing. Turn off heat.

Using a slotted spoon evenly distribute solids among the quart jars (you want to fill jars with solids a bit more then 1/2 but not quite 3/4s full) and finish topping off with soup juice to 1" headspace. Remove air bubbles, wipe rims really well, and assemble lids. Process in a pressure canner for 90 mins for quarts (75 mins for pints) at 10 lbs of pressure.

NOTE: This recipe makes 10+ quarts of soup - most canners only allow for 7 quarts to be canned at a time. You can either freeze the remaining soup, eat it, or leave it in the pot with heat off and wait to do a second batch. If soup has cooled just reheat until hot and fill remaining jars and process. If you decide to eat the soup turn heat to medium low and allow to simmer for at least 30 mins or more.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Broccoli-Cauliflower Leek Soup

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Soup of the Day... Chicken Booyah



Remember the Seinfeld episode... 
The Soup Nazi? One of my favorites!
"You can't eat this soup standing up, your knees buckle."

"The guy who runs the place is a little temperamental, especially about the ordering procedure. He's secretly referred to as the Soup Nazi."
"Why? What happens if you don't order right?"
"He yells and you don't get your soup." 


"It's very important not to embellish on your order. No extraneous comments. No questions. No compliments." 


"Um, excuse me, I - I think you forgot my bread."
"Bread, two dollars extra."
"Two dollars? But everyone in front of me got free bread."
"You want bread?"
"Yes, please."
"Three dollars!"
"What?"
"No soup for you!"

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.


Chicken Booyah 
Adapted from recipe found on TheChurchCook.Blogspot

The best way to describe Booyah is that it is a glorified chicken soup. It is generally made with two kinds of meat but chicken is the predominate meat. You can either use beef or pork as the second meat, totally up to you. Makes 10+ quarts 

Ingredients 

1 whole rotisserie chicken, de-boned, skin discarded, meat shredded 

OR 

you can use any chicken you like - at least 3 to 4 cups of chicken 

2 pounds beef stew meat or pork (pork can be ground) (usually beef is precooked and shredded but can be cubed and added raw) (If using ground meat - precook and drain well) 

2 large onions, chopped 

3 celery ribs, chopped 

4 cups shredded green cabbage

4 cups homemade vegetable or beef stock or broth 

6 cups chicken broth 

3 cloves of garlic, grated/minced 

2 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes OR 2 pints of home canned diced tomatoes OR you can use 1 quart of home canned tomato juice. 

1 pound (2 or 3) russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch pieces 

2 carrots, peeled and sliced 1/4 inch thick 

1 cup frozen peas 

1 cup frozen corn (Optional) 

INSTRUCTIONS 
In a large stock pot add onions, carrots, grated garlic, and celery. Stir in stock/broth and canned diced tomatoes. Turn on heat to medium high. Add shredded beef, cabbage, 1-1/4 teaspoons canning salt, and 1 teaspoon pepper and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and stir in potatoes, shredded chicken, corn, and peas. Stir well to ensure even mixing. Turn off heat. 

Using a slotted spoon evenly distribute solids among the quart jars (you want to fill jars with solids a bit more then 1/2 but not quite 3/4s full) and finish topping off with soup juice to 1" headspace. Remove air bubbles, wipe rims really well, and assemble lids. Process in a pressure canner for 90 mins for quarts (75 mins for pints) at 10 lbs of pressure. 

NOTE: This recipe makes 10+ quarts of soup - most canners only allow for 7 quarts to be canned at a time. You can either freeze the remaining soup, eat it, or leave it in the pot with heat off and wait to do a second batch. If soup has cooled just reheat until hot and fill remaining jars and process. 

If you decide to eat the soup turn heat to medium low and allow to simmer for at least 30 mins or more.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day (another Booyah!) Booyah, Savannah Style

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Soup of the Day... Black-Eyed Pea and Sausage Soup

A first rate soup is more creative than a second rate painting.


Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.
Black-Eyed Pea and Sausage Soup 
Found on Canning Only Recipes

2 lbs dried black-eyed peas, soaked overnight 

2 quarts tomato juice (I used 2 qts of home canned tomato juice) 

2 cups carrots, diced 

4 cups potatoes, diced 

3 cups celery, chopped 

1 teaspoon canning salt and pepper (Black or White) 

1 bay leaf 

3 cups onions, diced

1-2 lbs. bulk sausage, browned and drained... or sausages in casing, cut in bite-sized pieces

2 lbs bacon, diced OR 1 cup of diced ham 

Directions:

Combine all ingredients except sausage, bacon and onion in large pot. Cook over medium heat until soft (this took almost 45 mins on low). Cut bacon into small pieces and fry in skillet. Remove bacon and cook onion in bacon grease until soft, drain on papper towels. Add sausage, bacon and onion to bean mixture and heat until it simmers. Taste for salt and pepper. Remove bay leaf before putting in jars. 

Fill hot mixture into sterilized jars, filling to within 1" of tops of jars (I found that using the home canned tomato juice the juice in the soup was pretty thick and there was not enough of it. So I used hot water to finish filling the jars to 1" headspace). Pressure can 1 hour and 15 mins for pints and 1 hour and 30 mins for quarts at 10 lbs. 

I ended up with 14 pints 

NOTE: The National Center for Home Food Preservation has not done much testing on the safety of canning bacon. What little research they have done they have determined that 1 to 2 slices of bacon per jar is safe enough. Their concern is the fat content in bacon and the chance it can go rancid or harbor botulism that cannot be destroyed by temps reached in home canning. Some people have suggested that 2 pounds of bacon in this recipe is not safe. To be honest I didn't use the full two pounds ... more than 1 pound ... but not 2 pounds. If you decide to make this recipe just be aware that this is not an approved recipe from the NCHFP. But you can substitute ham in this recipe for the bacon.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Chicken Booyah

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Soup of the Day... Black Eyed Pea and Cabbage Soup



"Little is nobler than presiding over a kettle of homemade soup."


Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Black Eyed Pea and Cabbage Soup 
Found on Canning Only Recipes (Pinterest)

Makes about 3 to 4 quarts or more (depends on amount of cabbage used) 
Ingredients

1 lb pkg black-eyed peas, sorted and rinsed. (I soaked black eyed peas overnight in a bowl of water filled to about 1 inch above peas.) 

OR 

4 cups of frozen peas 

3 or 4 potatoes, cut 1/2-inch pieces 

2 medium carrots, chopped 

4 cloves garlic, finely minced or about 2 Tbsp.

2 cups water 

1 quart of beef or ham broth (homemade preferably) 

1 small cabbage or 1/2 of a large cabbage, shredded or chopped 

1 onion, cut in half and sliced thinly 

1 sweet pepper - seeds removed and chopped (optional) 

1 tsp of canning salt (optional) 

Add beef or ham broth and water to a large stock pot and heat to a boil. Add carrot, potatoes, black eyed peas, sweet pepper (if using), salt (if using), and onions. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 30 mins. Add cabbage last 5 mins of cooking (you only want it to wilt down, not cook). Stir soup occasionally. 

Using a slotted spoon divide soup solids between 3 or 4 quart jars to about two thirds full. Finish filling with soup broth to 1 inch headspace. Wipe rims with wet paper towel, assembly lids, tighten finger tight. Process 1 hour and 15 mins for pints and 1 hour and 30 mins for quarts at 10 lbs of pressure in a pressure canner.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... 
Black-Eyed Pea and Sausage Soup

Monday, September 21, 2015

Soup of the Day... Black Bean Soup



“Anyone who tells a lie has not a pure heart and cannot make a good soup” (Ludwig van Beethoven).

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.


Black Bean Soup 
Found on subsistresist.wordpress

Soak 4 c. black beans overnight in plenty of water. In the morning or as soon as you can get to it, drain beans, rinse well, and pour boiling water or unsalted broth over. Allow to soak another 30 minutes, while you get everything else ready. 

Chop 2 onions, 
2 small stalks celery, 
2 or 3 carrots, and 
10-12 Roma tomatoes (you can use canned chopped tomatoes too if, like me, you can’t get a decent fresh tomato) 

Distribute veggies evenly between all 16 jars. Dry fry (cook in a skillet with no oil over medium heat) until fragrant, but be careful not to burn: 

3 T chili powder 
1 T cumin 
2 t. cinnamon 
1 t. ground ginger
1 t. black pepper 
1 T. paprika (Or, if you want to make it easier on yourself, and you like spicy food, just go with 4-5 T. of chili powder, and skip the rest of those spices) 

When the spices are smelling good, add 

1 T. oregano 
1 T. garlic powder 
2 lbs of burger 

Brown meat over high heat, it doesn’t need to cook through, just brown nicely for flavor. Distribute meat among jars. It’s probably been half an hour by now, so drain your beans again, but this time reserve the soaking liquid. Measure it into a pot, then add enough water to equal 11 cups total (if you used canned tomatoes, add in their juice here, as part of your liquid). Stir in a 

6 oz can of tomato paste. 

Bring to a boil. Meanwhile, back to your jars. Distribute beans between them, then add to each jar ½ t. salt and a big pinch of frozen corn Jars should be full to within 1 inch of top. Don’t be tempted to overfill, the beans are still going to expand a tad.

Get your canner and lids ready to go. When the broth boils, pour into each jar, to within ¾ inch of top (ie: should just cover the chunks). Process as per canner instructions, for 75 minutes at 10 lbs pressure. (90 minutes for quart jars)


Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Black Eyed Pea and Cabbage Soup

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Soup of the Day... Black Bean Soup with Ham

Photo from SB Canning



Black Beans... Good for your heart!
Among all groups of food commonly eaten worldwide, no group has a more health-supportive mix of protein-plus-fiber than legumes. Included here, of course, is the amazing protein-plus-fiber content of black beans. From a single, one-cup serving of black beans you get nearly 15 grams of fiber (well over half of the Daily Value and the same amount consumed by the average U.S. adult in one entire day of eating) and 15 grams of protein (nearly one third of the Daily Value and equivalent to the amount in 2 ounces of a meat like chicken or a fish like salmon). You won't find this outstanding protein-fiber combination in fruit, vegetables, grains, meats, dairy products, nuts and seeds, or seafood. The almost magical protein-fiber combination in legumes—including black beans—explains important aspects of their health benefits for the digestive tract, the blood sugar regulatory system, and the cardiovascular system. Each area of systems benefit has a strong research basis.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.
Black Bean Soup with Ham
from sbcanning

1 lb. bag of dried black beans 

2 med. Onions, one halved and one finely diced. 

4 carrots diced 

3-4 cloves garlic, minced 

1 any hot pepper seeded and diced (optional) 

2 ½ quarts of chicken stock

2 cups ham diced 

2 tsp. ground cumin 

3 tsp. kosher salt (adjust to taste) 

1 ½ tsp. fresh ground black pepper 

½ tsp. cayenne pepper (optional) 

2 tsp. Mexican Oregano 

Sort, and wash beans. Soak overnight in bowl with enough water to cover by 3 inches. Drain, rinse and put in a pot, cover with cold water by 3 in. Add the onion cut in half. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, simmer for 30 min. In another pot combine chicken stock, spices and vegetables. Allow to simmer for 5 minutes until heated through. Strain beans, discard liquid and onion. 

Strain stock, reserve vegetable and stock. In a hot pint or quart jar fill ¼ full of beans, add ¼ cup vegetables and ham add stock leaving 1 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles adjust level to 1 inch, wipe rim and add lid. Pressure can pints for 75 minutes, quarts for 90 min. at 10 lbs. or on 11 on dial gauge. Makes about 6-7 pints or 3-4 quarts.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... another Black Bean Soup

Saturday, September 19, 2015

Soup of the Day... Better Than Yo Mama's Chicken Noodle Soup




Chicken Soup and Sickness

Chicken soup, a popular home remedy for the common cold since at least the 12th century, may really help. The steam from chicken soup may open up congested noses and throats. Soup also provides fluid, which is important for fighting infection. Some researchers suggest that substances in chicken soup reduce the inflammation associated with the common cold, thus providing some relief of symptoms.

Although researchers have not been able to prove that chicken soup helps cure the common cold or other illnesses, you may want to take advantage of these apparent healing properties.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Better Than Yo Mama's Chicken Noodle Soup­­
shared by Karen McMaster and Nancy Compton Huskins

4 lbs. chicken thighs and drum sticks 

Cold water (2 gallons) 

2 lg onions coarsely chopped 

2 large carrots coarsely chopped 

Celery leaves, coarsely chopped 

2 celery ribs, coarsely chopped 

Salt and fresh ground pepper

4 whole, peeled garlic cloves

2 bay leaves

1 Tbsp. dried thyme leaves

1 pkg. extra wide no yolk noodles 

¼ cup finely diced parsley

Rinse chicken thoroughly.

Add raw, chicken to stock pot along with the water, onion, carrot, celery leaves,celery, dried thyme, bay leaves, pepper and garlic cloves.

Bring to a boil and simmer for 1 ½ hours until chicken is thoroughly cooked.

When done, remove chicken from pot. (remove bay leaves)

When chicken is cooled, debone and cut chicken meat into small pieces.

Add chicken back to broth. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Bring to a boil then turn heat to simmer until vegetables are done to suit your taste add noodles and cook halfway (approximately 5 minutes). skim as much fat off the top as possible.

Add parsley.

In the meanwhile make your 8 jars jars sterile and hot...add soup and noodles evenly to each quart jar leaving 1/2" headspace. process in pressure canner for 80 minutes for quarts at 11 lbs. pressure.


Note from Granny: There's a list of food items that the "powers that be" do not recommend for canning... I do realize that pasta is on that list. There are good reasons for these ingredients to be on those "no-no" lists, however, many people just assume that if an ingredient is on the "no-no" list, that means it's unsafe... not necessarily... do a little more research before you condemn! Pasta is on the list simply because the "powers that be" assume the end result of canning pasta will be a mushy noodle and hence not optimally flavorful or texturally appealing. Same goes for cabbage, summer squashes, etc. Not every "un-recommended" food is unsafe, some are on the list for being "unappealing." I personally have never canned a soup with the noodles in the jar... I can mine without the pasta and add the pasta when I open the jar to cook for a meal... some folks prefer to can the noodles in with the recipe, it's their decision. There is a big difference in "not recommended" and "unsafe."

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Black Bean Soup with Ham

Friday, September 18, 2015

Soup of the Day... Beef Vegetable Soup



Some Soupy Facts
  • America’s first colonists carried “Pocket soup,” a substance not unlike today’s bouillon cube, to which one could add hot water and various wild or domestic roots and vegetables and make a nutritious soup.
  • According to legend, this portable soup – made popular by Lewis and Clark – grew into an industry of dried and processed meats and vegetables supplied to Union troops during the Civil War.
  • The first commercially available pocket soup, of dried ingredients, was offered by Knorr in the 1870s.
  • One of the oldest soups on record is “Cock-a-leekie,” literally chicken and leeks
Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Beef Vegetable Soup 
By Patti Holland 
makes 12 quarts

3 qts. water or beef broth (omit boullion)

1 qt. home made v­8 juice, (I do not see why u could not use tom juice) 

1/4 cup beef broth boullion

1 tsp. chili powder

1 tsp. garlic powder

1/4 cup brown sugar

Combine these ingredients in a large stock pot and bring to a slow simmer over medium heat. Stirring occasionally.

2 lbs. ground beef or venison slightly browned

2 cups chopped onion

2 cups chopped celery

6 cups skinned diced potatoes

1 can kidney beans, rinsed

2 lbs. frozen mixed vegetables

2 14 oz. cans tomatoes, or the equivalent of skinned fresh chopped

Cook the onions and celery just until soft with a small amount of olive oil. In a large bowl or pot, mix the onions, celery, meat, and vegetable mixture and gently blend it all together.

You are not going to cook the soup before you can it, if you do it will turn to mush. In properly prepared sanitized jars divide the mixture into each jar. About 2" from the top. Pour your hot broth into each jar to about 1/2 inch from the top. Wipe rims then adjust your lids and bands.

Process pressure canner at 10lbs. for 90 minutes (for quarts, 75 minutes for pints. * If you use tom juice, taste the broth for seasoning, and season as needed.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... 
Better Than Yo Mama's Chicken Noodle Soup­­

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Soup of the Day... Beef Soup with Country Vegetables



Some Soupy Facts
  • In the late 1700s, apparently the French King was so enamored with himself that he had his royal chefs create a soup that would allow him to see his own reflection in the bowl. Sheesh! But as a result, consommé (clear broth) was born.
  • In the French Court of Louis XI, the ladies' meals were mostly soup. Guess what the reasoning was? They were afraid that chewing would make them break out in facial wrinkles! 
  • Why did thin soups become all the rage in Europe during the 17th century? The spoon was invented. Why was the spoon invented? Because of the latest fashion trend: large and stiff ruffles that the men and the women of the high courts wore around their necks. The design of the spoon was to accommodate wearers of those large ruffles and keep themselves from getting dripped on.
  • Frank Sinatra always asked for chicken and rice soup to be available to him in his dressing rooms before he went on stage. He said it always cleared his mind and settled his tummy.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.


Beef Soup with Country Vegetables

By Rose Robinson

6 lbs Stew meat browned­ do not fully cook it (or meat of your choice)

2 lbs chopped carrots (1 cup per qt)

2 lbs potatoes peeled and cubed (1 cup per qt)

1 lb chopped celery (1/2 cup per qt)

1 lb or less chopped onion (1/4 cup per qt)

1 tsp per qt minced garic (optional)

1/2 tsp per qt Worcestershire Sauce

1/2 tsp per qt Catsup

1/2 tsp per qt Beef Base if using hot water otherwise 6 qt of Beef Broth brought to a boil

Notes:

Chop all vegetabes and put in bowls of water until ready to use. Drain them when ready to fill jars.

Meat is 1 inch cubed with as much fat trimed as possible

Once broth is at a boil ­ Pack jars in this order­

Meat

Potatoes

Carrots

Celery

Onions

Spices

Hot Broth with 1 inch headspace

Process for meat used.

Stew meat 90 minutes at 10 lbs pressure

Roughly 13 quarts of soup

Note from Granny: I've had a few people question the fact that the instructions state to brown the meat... and the photo shows non-browned meat... let me clarify... follow the written instructions, the photo is a "prettied up" representation of the recipe... READ... and FOLLOW the written instructions.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Beef Vegetable Soup

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Soup of the Day... Beef and Barley Stew with Roasted Winter Vegetables


Soup or stew?
  • What is the difference between soup and stew? On the most basic level there is no absolute difference. Like ancient pottage, both soup and stew descend from economical, easy, healthy, forgiving, and locally sourced family feeds. Throughout time, these two interrelated menu items converge and diverge. Modern American cultural context does, however, separate soup from stew quite simply. The test is not in the ingredients or method, but which course it is served. Soup is starter/accompaniment; stew is main course.
  • Soup, in some contexts, variously became regarded as haute cuisine (consomme, vichyssoise), healthful restoratifs (18th century French Restaurants & Jewish grandmother chicken soup), and economical family fare (commercial vegetable beef, tomato). Soup can be served as first course (classic menu), lunch (paired with sandwich or salad) and dessert (fruit soup). It can be served hot (most) or cold (gazpacho, cucumber). Either way, the stock reigns supreme.

  • Stew is generally appreciated in larger chunks as main course, always served warm. Slow cooking renders tough cuts of meat delicious. The fact "stew" was a verb before it was a noun means much. Deliberate slow cooking with minimal moisture produces amazing results. Stew is generally regarded as community feed ( Brunswick Stew, Kentucky Burgoo & Booya) or family fare; not eligible for haute cuisine.
Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Beef and Barley Stew with 
Roasted Winter Vegetables­­
shared by Connie Bunfunny

Prep: 45 mins Cook: 1 hr 35 mins Roast: 35 mins 375°F

Ingredients

1/4 cup all ­purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper

2 pounds boneless beef chuck roast, trimmed of excess fat and cut into 1­inch pieces 

1/4 CUP olive oil

1/2 cup chopped onion (1 medium)

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed

1 14-1/2 ounce can beef broth

2 cups WATER

1 cup dry red wine

4 medium red or yellow potatoes and/or sweet potatoes, cut into 1­inch chunks

4 medium carrots and/or parsnips, peeled and cut into 1­inch chunks

1/2 cup regular barley

Beef broth (optional)

2 tablespoons snipped fresh parsley (optional)

In a large bowl combine flour, 1/4 teaspoon of the salt, and 1/4 teaspoon of the pepper. Add meat; toss to coat. In a Dutch oven heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium heat. Add half of the meat; cook until browned, stirring occasionally. Remove meat from Dutch oven; set aside. Repeat with another 1 tablespoon of the oil and the REMAINING meat.

Add onion, garlic, and thyme to Dutch oven. Cook and stir for 3 minutes. Add the one can broth, stirring to scrape up any browned bits from bottom of the Dutch oven. Add the WATER and wine. Bring to boiling; reduce heat to low. Simmer, covered, for 1 hour.

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375 degrees F. In a shallow ROASTING PAN combine potatoes and carrots and/or parsnips. Drizzle with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil; sprinkle with the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and the remaining 1/4 teaspoon pepper. Toss to coat. Roast, uncovered, for 35 to 45 minutes or until vegetables are tender and lightly browned, stirring once or twice.

Stir barley into beef mixture. Cook about 35 minutes more or until barley is tender. Stir in roasted vegetables. (To serve today, omit Steps 5 and 6 and continue as DIRECTED IN Step 7.)

Cool stew slightly and transfer to an airtight container. Cover and chill for up to 3 days. (Or transfer to FREEZER CONTAINERS. Cover and freeze for up to 2 months.)

To serve, if frozen, thaw mixture in refrigerator for 1 to 2 days. Place thawed or chilled mixture in a Dutch oven and heat over medium heat until bubbly, stirring occasionally. Stir in additional beef broth, if necessary, to reach DESIRED consistency.

If DESIRED, stir in fresh parsley.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Beef Soup with Country Vegetables

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Soup of the Day... Award Winning French Onion Soup


A little Soupy History

  • Food historians tell us the history of soup is probably as old as the history of cooking. The act of combining various ingredients in a large pot to create a nutritious, filling, easily digested, simple to make/serve food was inevitable. This made it the perfect choice for both sedentary and traveling cultures, rich and poor, healthy people and invalids. Soup (and stews, pottages, porridges, gruels, etc.) evolved according to local ingredients and tastes. New England chowder, Spanish gazpacho, Russian borscht, Italian minestrone, French onion, Chinese won ton, and Campbell's tomato...are all variations on the same theme.

  • Soups were easily digested and were prescribed for invalids since ancient times. The modern restaurant industry is said to be based on soup. Restoratifs (wheron the word "restaurant" comes) were the first items served in public restaurants in 18th century Paris. Broth [Pot-au-feu], bouillion, and consomme entered here. Classic French cuisine generated many of the soups we know today.

  • Advancements in science enabled soups to take many forms...portable, canned, dehydrated, microwave-ready. "Pocket soup" was carried by colonial travelers, as it could easily be reconstituted with a little hot water. Canned and dehydrated soups were available in the 19th century. These supplied the military, covered wagon trains, cowboy chuck wagons, and the home pantry. Advances in science also permitted the adjustment of nutrients to fit specific dietary needs (low salt, high fiber, etc.).
Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.


"Award Winning French Onion Soup" 
Kim Foster Schonefeld

This recipe makes a pot of soup that serves 6. I triple it if I am going to can it that way I get 7 quarts with enough left over for lunch or dinner.

Ingredients:

6 large yellow onions (sliced thin),

2 tablespoons olive oil,

1 carton each or 32.oz home made chicken broth and beef broth,

1 cup sherry,

1/2 teaspoon salt,

1/4 teaspoon pepper,

1/2 teaspoon granulated garlic,

2 teaspoons fresh or dried thyme, 1 bay leaf,

Directions:

In a large stock pot over medium heat, caramelize onions in oil until dark golden brown. Add sherry; cook for 6 minutes stirring often. Add chicken and beef stocks, salt, pepper, thyme, bay leaf and garlic. Simmer 45 minutes. Serve: Pour soup into oven safe crock or bowl; top with nice thick slice of crusty bread and a slice of cheese. Bake in a 350. degree oven until cheese is melted and slightly browned.

For canning, I use a slotted spoon and funnel to gather onions from stock pot and place in sterilized jars equally. Then ladle the soup into jars leaving 1" head space. (Do not add bread and cheese until opening to serve as suggested above). You will Love this Soup! PC 90 Minutes for quarts 75 minutes for pints.


Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... 
Beef and Barley Stew with Roasted Winter Vegetables­­

Monday, September 14, 2015

Soup of the Day... Autumn Harvest Soup



Soupy Facts

Soups are great as fillers when you are on a diet. Don’t want to stuff yourself at dinner? Have a soup just before. A cup of soup also makes for a smart low-cal snack. Simply opt for a clear soup like Knorr’s Hot and Sour or Veg Manchow Soup to make sure you keep the calories away.

Want to remove excess fat from your soup? Simply take a lettuce leaf and draw it across the surface of the soup. The excess fat sticks to the leaf. You can also skim the excess fat off with a large spoon.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

Autumn Harvest Soup 
Winola Scroggins Lake

Ingredients:

2 large cans of pumpkin puree (you can use fresh, just bake it, mash it then puree it)

2 large cans of chicken broth

1 or 2 pounds of mild ground sausage (browned and drained thoroughly) 

1 C diced onion

3 tablespoon of garlic minced dried or fresh depending on what's available 

2 (or 3 if preferred­­ taste after 2) Cups of cream or milk, or powdered milk

1 large can hominy (drained and rinsed)

Salt, pepper to taste

1/4 ­-1/2 Cup of any type of greens (spinach, kale, collards, etc.) to be placed in pot about 5 to 10 minutes prior to serving. Mainly for color

Directions:

Use a large stock pot and saute onion and garlic in a very small amount of oil (or margarine) until tender. Add in all other ingredients. Add green stuff about 15 minutes prior to serving. Simmer for about 30 minutes.

This recipe makes enough for a few days for a couple of people. It also freezes well.

Depending on your soup preferences, you can play with the consistency of the pumpkin puree in ratio to your chicken broth and cream/milk. it can be thick and hearty or thin and tasty.

You can make a "lite" version by omitting the cream/milk and adding non­fat dry or dairy creamer. You can eliminate sausage for less fat.

(Note from Granny... if you try to can this recipe, leave the cream out til after opening)

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Award Winning French Onion Soup

Sunday, September 13, 2015

Soup of the Day... 15 Bean Soup with Ham


Some Soup Facts

  • Groucho Marx offered the following explanation for the title of the 1933 movie “Duck Soup”: “Take two turkeys, one goose, four cabbages, but no duck, and mix them together. After one taste, you’ll duck soup the rest of your life.”
  • The original Campbell’s Soup labels were orange and blue. They were changed after Herberton L. Williams, who became the company’s treasurer, comptroller and assistant general manager, saw the Cornell University football team play against the University of Pennsylvania. Williams was so taken with the colors of the Cornell uniforms — red and white — that he proposed the Campbell labels be changed to match.
  • Bouillon and consommé are both clear soup, but they are very different. Bouillon is basically a broth, whereas consommé is much more complex and is very high in gelatin. So when consommé cools, it becomes a gel.
Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.
15 Bean Soup with Ham 
Margarita Joy ­Gangestad 
6 jars of 15 bean soup with ham:

1/2 cup dried beans (15 bean mix from grocery store) (I like mine soupy) per quart jar, 
1 packet of seasoning from bag divided between six jars
Cubes of ham (as much as you like per jar)
1/2 cup chopped onions per jar,
1/8 to 1/4 cup chopped green peppers per jar,
1 small can tomato paste divided 6 ways,
1/2 Tbsp chopped garlic,
1/2 Tbsp cumin,
1 quart jar of chicken vegetable stock divided 6 ways
Water to fill to 1 inch headspace
Can for 90 minutes at pounds for your area

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... Autumn Harvest Soup

Saturday, September 12, 2015

Soup of the Day... 10 Bean Soup


Some Soupy Facts

  • The earliest archaeological evidence for the consumption of soup dates back to 6000 BC, and it was hippopotamus soup. 
  • February 4th is National Homemade Soup Day.
  • Traditionally, soups are classified into two main groups: clear soups and thick soups. The established French classifications of clear soups are bouillon and consommé. Thick soups are classified depending upon the type of thickening agent used: purées are vegetable soups thickened with starch.
  • Americans eat more than 10 billion bowls of soup each year.
  • Women are twice as likely to order soup for lunch as men.



Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.


Ten Bean Soup

Found on Vicki'sCanningWorld

1/2 cup black beans
1/2 cup kidney beans 
1/2 cup navy beans 
1/2 cup pinto beans 
1/2 cup Great Northern beans 
1/4 cup black eye peas 
1/4 cup chickpeas 
1/4 cup split peas 
1/4 cup lentils 
(Note: All above beans would be of the dried bean variety)
1/2 cup fresh-cut green beans 
2 bay leaves 
1 tablespoon tarragon 
1 tablespoon summer savory 
Salt -- to taste 
Ground black pepper -- to taste 

Combine all dried beans and cover with cold water. Soak in a cool place, about 12 to 18 hours. 

Prepare canning jars and closures according to manufacturer's instructions. 

Drain dried beans. Cover dried beans with water by 2 inches in a large saucepot. Add green beans, bay leaves and spices. Bring to a boil; boil 30 minutes. Remove bay leaves. 

Pack hot soup into hot jars, leaving 1-inch headspace. Remove air bubbles with a nonmetallic spatula. Wipe jar rim clean. Place lid on jar with sealing compound next to glass. Screw band down evenly and firmly just until a point of resistance is met -- fingertip tight. 

Process 1 hour and 30 minutes at 10 pounds pressure in a pressure canner. For elevations higher than 1,000 feet, increase pressure accordingly following cooker manufacturer's recommendation. This recipe yields about 6 quarts.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... 15 Bean Soup with Ham

Friday, September 11, 2015

Soup of the Day... 7-Can Taco Soup

The word soup comes from French soupe ("soup," "broth"), which comes through Vulgar Latin suppa ("bread soaked in broth") from a Germanic source, from which also comes the word "sop," a piece of bread used to soak up soup or a thick stew.





Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

7-Can Taco Soup

Found on Vicki's Canning World From the Kitchen of Deep South Dish

Ingredients
•1/2 tablespoon of olive oil 
•1 pound of lean ground beef 
•1 cup of chopped onion 
•3 cloves of garlic, finely minced 
•1 envelope of ranch dressing mix 
•1 envelope of taco seasoning mix 
•1 can of diced tomatoes, undrained 
•1 can of Rotel diced tomatoes, undrained 
•1 can of green chilies, undrained 
•4 cups of beef broth or stock 
•1 can of chili beans, undrained 
•1 can of kidney beans, drained & rinsed 
•1 can of pinto beans, drained & rinsed 
•1 can of whole kernel corn, drained 

•Finely shredded cheddar or pepper jack cheese, for garnish, optional
•Chopped fresh tomato, for garnish, optional 
•Diced avocado, for garnish, optional 
•Shredded lettuce, for garnish, optional 
•Homemade or commercial tortilla strips, for garnish, optional 
•Sour cream, for garnish, optional 

Instructions 
Heat the olive oil in a soup pot over medium heat, add the ground beef and onion and cook until beef is browned, breaking it up as it cooks. Add the garlic and cook another minute. Stir in the ranch dressing and taco seasoning packets and cook and stir for another minute. Add the un-drained, diced tomatoes, Rotel tomatoes, and green chilies; cook and stir for 5 minutes. Stir in the beef broth and the undrained chili beans. Drain and rinse the kidney beans and pinto beans; drain the corn and add all to the pot and bring up to a boil. 

To can: 
Fill jars leaving 1 inch head space, pressure can pints for 75 minutes quarts for 90 minutes. Serve with a sprinkle of cheese, chopped tomato, diced avocado, tortilla chips, green onion, and a dollop of sour cream, or your own favorite toppings, if desired. 

Cook's Notes: This is the mix of beans and veggies that I use, but with a well stocked pantry, you can vary the recipe according to your own tastes, using a variety of substitutes. Swap the beef for ground turkey or use cooked, shredded chicken for a different twist.

Tomorrow's Soup of the Day... 10-Bean Soup!

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Soup of the Day... 3 Colours Orange Soup

We begin our Soup Recipe Series! Be aware, they will not all be canning recipes... some may be recipes using fresh ingredients, some will indeed be canning recipes, some may be recipes for soups made from individually canned ingredients, and some may be adapted to canning by you, the canner! I so enjoyed incorporating tidbits of information in addition to the recipes during our Amish series and I will try to do the same throughout this series, whenever possible. Enjoy! 




Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: Some folks don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they may live in another country where the standards are not the same, they may use heirloom methods passed down through the generations, they may choose other canning methods not recommended. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take NO responsibility for them.

3 Colours Orange Soup 
By Cha'kwaina Mary Ellen Elmore 

Packed with goodness and flavour, this colourful concoction is one of my favourite soups.

The three orange colours come from carrot, sweet potato, and orange, the fruit.

To keep the dish vegetarian, use vegetable stock, otherwise chicken stock may be used. Serves 6

1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil

1 Tbsp. unsalted butter

1 medium onion, finely chopped

2 or 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

3 cardamom pods, remove seeds and crush with rolling pin

400g carrots, chopped into about 1cm cubes

600g sweet potato, peeled and chopped into 1cm cubes

1 tsp. chilli sauce (optional) 

 2 or 3 strips of orange rind (taking care not to include too much pith)

Juice of one orange

1.5 litre vegetable or chicken stock

1 Tbsp. chopped mint leaves

1 Tbsp. chopped Italian parsley leaves (or coriander for a more Asian feel) 

2 Tbsp. cream (optional)

Croutons

2 or 3 slices of stale bread, crusts removed, cut into 1.5cm cubes

Oil for frying

In a large saucepan, over medium heat, put butter and extra virgin olive oil. When hot, add onion and garlic and cook for 2 or 3 minutes until onion has softened (making sure the garlic doesn't burn).

Add cardamom seed, cook for 1 minute.

Add sweet potato and carrot and cook for 2 or 3 minutes.

Add chilli sauce (if using), orange rind, juice, vegetable stock, and mint and parsley leaves.

Reduce heat and allow to simmer for 45 minutes.

Remove rind, and two or three tablespoons each of carrot and sweet potato. Reserve.

Blend the rest of the soup, either in a food processor or with a potato masher. Stir in cream, if using.

Just before serving, heat oil in frying pan (preferably non­stick), and fry bread cubes to brown all over.

Degree of difficulty: Low. Keepability: Keeps a couple of days in the refrigerator. Wine companion: A fragrant Riesling.

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Amish Recipe Series... Sweet Peppers, Amish Style

This is the last post in our Amish Recipe Series... next series we'll do will be Soups. I've really enjoyed visiting the Amish, their culture, and their recipes. I hope you have too!



Is the Amish population growing?
Yes. The population has doubled over the past 20 years due to sizeable families (5 or more children on average) and high retention rates (on average about 85 percent of Amish youth eventually join the church).

When are Amish youth baptized?
Typically between the ages of 18 and 21. As Anabaptists, the Amish church emphasizes the importance of making a voluntary adult decision to become a Christian and join the church.

Where do Amish youth go to school?
About 90 percent attend one- or two-room private Amish schools; the others go to rural public schools. In Amish schools, an Amish teacher is typically responsible to teach all eight grades, or in the case of a two-room school, half of the grades. Amish children typically end their formal schooling at the end of eighth grade. 

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: The Amish don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they follow methods passed down from generation to generation. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take no responsibility for them.
Sweet Peppers, Amish Style

Peggy Stolfus

Red, yellow, and green bell peppers

To make the syrup you will need

4 cups water

1 cup vinegar

5 cups granulated sugar

Combine the above ingredients and bring them to a boil.

Next, cut the peppers into strips, all colors. Pack the peppers into jars and then pour the syrup over them. Finally, cold pack for 5 minutes

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Amish Recipe Series... Amish Spiced Gooseberries



10 Common Amish Surnames

Certain Amish surnames occur with great frequency. Here are ten of the most common:

1. Miller-the most common of all Amish last names. Joseph Stoll writes: “The German spelling was Müller, and because there were many Millers in Europe, the name was very common, with no common ancestor for many people of this name. There were a number of Anabaptists of this name in different parts of Switzerland.” Miller is most common in the Midwest; a few Millers may be found in Lancaster County, however.

2. Stoltzfus– The most common Pennsylvania Amish surname. Nicholas Stoltzfus (1719-1774) is believed to be the common ancestor of all those with this name among Amish and Mennonites today. Also occasionally seen spelled as Stoltzfoos.

3. Yoder – A Swiss-origin name apparently derived from the name “Theodore”. Amish bearing this name spell it Yoder; GAMEO gives the following historical alternatives: Ioder, Joder, Jodter, Jotter, Yoeder, Yother, Yothers, Yotter. “Strong” Jacob Yoder (c. 1726-1790), known for great physical feats, is one of the most prominent historical carriers of this name, with many descendants among Amish today.

5. Schwartz– A Swiss Amish surname. Nearly half of the Amish in the Adams County settlement bear this name (as of 2007, 529 of 1163 Adams County Amish families were Schwartz households). Also seen in Allen County, but not common outside of Swiss communities.

4. Beiler– More commonly spelled Byler in Midwestern communities such as Holmes County, Ohio. Jacob Beiler (1698-1771), ancestor of most Amish Beilers/Bylers, arrived in America on the Charming Polly (not to be confused with the Charming Nancy) in 1737. Read Beiler’s will here.

6. Troyer- Hans Treyer or Dreier was one of the first Anabaptists executed (was drowned with two others in Bern in 1529). John Troyer of the Kokomo, Indiana community, had possibly the largest family ever among Amish, with 31 children (29 of his own by two wives, plus two step-children), though apparently not all survived to adulthood.

7. Bontrager– other forms of this last name include Bontreger, Borntrager, Borntreger. Most frequently seen in northern Indiana. A Swiss origin name.

8. King- Along with Fisher and Beiler the most common Lancaster name following Stoltzfus. A number of individuals bore the name Koenig or König in Europe. Joseph Stoll notes: “Between 1732 and 1806, 38 persons bearing the name König arrived in Philadelphia. It is not known how many of these were Amish or Mennonite.”

9. Graber- Another name common among Swiss Amish, but also seen in non-Swiss communities.

10. Fisher– most Lancaster Amish can trace their descent back to Christian Fisher who very likely arrived in 1749 aboard the Phoenix, along with numerous other Amish passengers.

Other common Amish names include Hershberger, Schlabach, Hochstetler, Zook, Mast, Lapp, Schmucker, Schrock, Gingerich, and Weaver.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: The Amish don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they follow methods passed down from generation to generation. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take no responsibility for them.

Amish Spiced Gooseberries

Peggy Stolfus

5 lbs. ripe gooseberries

4 lbs. brown sugar

2 cups vinegar

2 tblsps. cloves

3 tsps. cinnamon

3 tsps. allspice

Wash and pick over the gooseberries. Combine gooseberries with spices, sugar, and vinegar, and cook slowly until the mixture becomes rather thick. Pour the spiced gooseberries into sterilized glasses and seal. This recipe will make 5 pints

Monday, September 7, 2015

Amish Recipe Series... Corn


The Amish Wedding
From amishnews.com

Most Amish weddings take place from late October through December, after the autumn harvest. Traditionally, the days for weddings are Tuesdays and Thursdays, so there is time in between to get ready for and clean up after each. Even so, it can get pretty busy during the "wedding season," with some Amish going to two or three weddings in one day!

A wedding is a particularly joyous occasion, for two baptized members of the church are joining in marriage, continuing the faith, and starting a new family together. While parents do not select who their children will marry, approval must be given, and the deacon usually acts as the go-between. At a church service after fall communion, the couples planning to marry are "published," announced in front of the congregation. But much preparation, mainly by the bride’s parents has already begun, including the planting in early summer of several hundred stalks of celery, an important part of any Lancaster Amish wedding feast.

The church service itself, held in home of the bride’s parents, is similar to the regular Sunday service. But the focus is on the serious step of marriage, for in the Amish church, there is no divorce. The sermons and Bible passages emphasize the relationship between man and wife.

When it is time for the vows, the couple comes forward. Each is asked if they will remain together until death, and if they will be loyal and care for each other during adversity, affliction, sickness, and weakness. The minister then takes the couples’ hands in his and, wishing them the blessing and mercy of God, tells them to "Go forth in the Lord’s name. You are now man and wife."

After the service, the benches used for the service are put together to form tables. During the wedding meal, the couple sits at the corner of two tables called the "eck," with their attendants on either side, and the unmarried boys sitting opposite the girls.

The meal itself is a feast indeed, including "roast," a mixture of bread filling and chicken, mashed potatoes, cole slaw, apple sauce, and creamed celery. Some leafy celery stalks are also put in jars to decorate the table. Among the desserts are pies, doughnuts, fruit, and pudding. There are usually several wedding cakes, some made by the women, but often one from a bakery as well. They are usually eaten later in the day. It will take several seatings to feed 200, 300, or more guests.

In the afternoon, the young people have a singing, and soon it is time for the evening meal, for those who have stayed through the day. For the seating of the young people, the bride makes a list of couples who are dating or interested in each other. As their names are called, they take their place at the table. On the bride’s side are the married or soon-to-be married couples, while the groom’s side has the other couples. Hymn-singing again follows the meal, with the "faster hymns" predominating this time.

After spending the night at the bride’s home, the newlyweds awake the next day to begin helping with the clean-up from the day before. The couple will spend upcoming weekends visiting relatives. Sometimes five or six houses are visited between a Friday and Sunday night. Wedding gifts are usually given to them at this time.

By the spring, the couple is usually ready to set up housekeeping in a home of their own. The groom would be growing his beard, a sign of marriage in the community. As in every culture, a wedding is a joyous celebration reflecting commitments, a new position in the community, and a new relationship as man and wife.

Today's recipe... Remember... Disclaimer: The Amish don't always follow updated USDA canning methods, they follow methods passed down from generation to generation. Use this recipe at your own discretion, or adapt it to your own method. I am sharing these recipes EXACTLY as they were sent to me and take no responsibility for them.

Recipe for Canned Corn - Amish Recipe

I've been asked to share my recipe for canned corn. I confess, I am always tweaking recipes and it's rare that I follow a recipe exactly as it is written. I can't help it--I usually think it can be improved if I added cinnamon or pepper or an extra dose of vanilla. The same goes for when I am using a recipe for canning jams. The recipe I use for canned corn comes from a recipe I modified a little bit. A dear friend of mine, who is Mennonite, gave me her family cookbook and in it are all sorts of lovely recipes; each one I've tried has been declared delicious by my family. She gave me the cookbook when I asked her about canning and said there were some recipes in there for canning. I thought it very generous to give me the cookbook when it was only our 2nd time meeting each other! Anyway, The recipe in the book is for freezing corn and is as follows:

* 4 qt raw corn, cut off cob

* 1 c sugar

* 4 tsp salt

* 1 qt water

Boil all ingredients for 15 minutes. Set pot in ice cold water. Cool completely. Ladle both corn and liquid into freezer safe containers. Freeze. 100 ears of corn equals 12 quarts.

The very first time I made this, we were eating the corn right out of the pan! Oh my! The sugar and the salt make a great salty-sweet flavor and it's Gretchen's favorite corn! She can always tell which corn I am using-- the store bought or my frozen corn. When I got the pressure canner, the instruction/recipe book included different canner recipes; the corn one is a basic one:

Boil corn on cob for 3 minutes. Remove from water and slice kernels off cob. Pack jars with corn then pour boiling water over corn, leaving 1 inch headspace. Pressure cook for 55 minutes using 10 pounds of pressure.

I modified the recipe a little bit and put a cup of sugar and 4 tsp of salt in the water to get that salty-sweet taste my family loves. I had some left over that wasn't enough to fill a jar for canning, and we tried it and it's as yummy as I hoped it would be.

 The sugar and the salt really add to the corn and make it taste great! Happy freezing or canning!
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